Introduction


The Blanket Effect is intended for others to learn about weather modification and its related subjects in an easy to understand way. Started in 2005, this blog is a work in progress as the technology advances

February 7, 2008

Could Haarp Blast Have Affected Polar Ozone Loss?

(note: Read through this posting to get to the bottom in which "The most recent solar cycle was associated with frequent and exceptionally strong episodes of charged particle precipitation", producing ozone reduction in the mid-to-upper stratosphere. excerpts are from Chapter 4 of Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2006 , WMO)

Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2006


The 2004/2005 Arctic stratosphere was exceptionally cold, particularly below 18 kilometers (km), leading to a value 25% larger than the previous record value.

Various independent studies and methods suggest that the chemical column ozone loss in 2004/2005 was among the largest ever observed.

However, dynamical processes resulted in March-average Arctic total ozone amounts being comparable to those in other recent winters, while the large losses contributed to low total column ozone over parts of Europe during March 2005.

Various independent studies and methods suggest that the chemical column ozone loss in 2004/2005 was among the largest ever observed.

In September 2002, the first ever observed Antarctic major stratospheric warming occurred. This early spring warming caused a drastic reduction of the ozone hole area and resulted in a less severe ozone hole.

Recent measurements suggest that bromine may play a more important role in polar ozone depletion than previously thought.

Profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO) measured in the Arctic vortex suggest that inorganic bromine levels may be 3 to 8 parts per trillion by volume larger than the amount of bromine carried to the stratosphere by methyl bromide (CH3Br) and halons.

This observation indicates the BrO + ClO cycle is likely to be a more efficient ozone loss process than considered in the previous Assessment. The BrO + ClO cycle is now estimated to contribute up to half of total chemical loss of polar ozone, even considering the more efficient ozone loss by the ClO dimer cycle (chlorine oxide).

For the first time, measurements show unambiguously that nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) polar stratospheric cloud particles can nucleate above the ice frost point, and there is additional evidence of their widespread occurrence. Widespread low number density NAT clouds can lead to denitrification and enhanced ozone loss.

The most recent solar cycle was associated with frequent and exceptionally strong episodes of charged particle precipitation. This caused only small decreases in total column ozone in the polar region.

However, the measured ozone reduction in the mid-to-upper stratosphere (30-50 km) exceeded 30% for weeks following certain episodes of intense particle precipitation.


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